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The 50 Safest Places to Live in Connecticut

The 50 Safest Places to Live in Connecticut

Connecticut may be the third-smallest state by area but it boasts some big achievements. For instance, the state is home to literary geniuses like Mark Twain, William F. Buckley Jr., Candace Bushnell, Suzanne Collins, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Arthur Miller and Maurice Sendak. It boasts an endless array of quint villages, scenic beaches and great seafood. It is home to the number 1 wooden roller coaster in the world. And according to a study by the American Human Development Index, the Constitution State is the best state to live in and citizens are generally happier than those of any other states. The final achievement may be due in large part to the city’s low crime rates. According to a recent FBI crime report, Connecticut’s crime rate is approximately 30 percent lower than the nation’s average, and the state’s top 50 safe cities are 65 percent safer than the nation as a whole. As of 2015, these communities reported less than one violent crime per 1,000 people; 28 of the cities on the list cited no more than ten violent crimes; and four of the safest cities—Weston, Easton, Madison and Redding—reported zero. Property crime is also on a decline in Connecticut, and is scarce in the featured cities. While the nation as a whole reported 25 property crimes per 1,000 individuals, every city on the list save for five reported less than 15 property crimes per 1,000 people. Whether you are a native to the state and want to develop your business in one of your home state’s safest cities or you are from elsewhere in the country and are looking to relocate...
The Basics of Audio Recorded With CCTV Security Cameras

The Basics of Audio Recorded With CCTV Security Cameras

When an employee spots a camera in the workplace, or even when a shopper spots a camera in a retail store, the first thing they want to know is if it can record sound. In short, the answer is yes, CCTV camera systems are designed to record audio in conjunction with images. However, whether or not an employer or a retail location is allowed to record audio is another matter entirely. Additionally, the type of cameras doing the recording – whether IP or Analog – dictates how the audio is captured. This post gives a brief overview of how audio is captured by CCTV security cameras, as well as a run down of the basic privacy rights that employers and retail locations alike must abide by when using surveillance systems to monitor employees.   Security Cameras in the Workplace Many employers will have security cameras installed to prevent theft and to ensure that employees are making good use of their paid-for time. This is perfectly acceptable so long as the employer informs employees that they are being recorded. However, there are some instances in which it is illegal for employers to record their workers. For instance, union workers may never be monitored by a camera system. States laws vary on where and how employees can be recorded, but all agree that private settings, such as restrooms, the break room and other areas where there is a reasonable expectation of privacy, are off limits. And Federal law dictates that the recording of oral communication in the workplace is strictly prohibited.   How Employers Can Use Video Surveillance Lawfully First and foremost,...
IP vs Analog Video Security

IP vs Analog Video Security

Anyone who is planning on getting a new video surveillance installed or an old one upgraded will have to deal with choosing between an IP and analog video format. It is important to remember that even though IP (Internet Protocol) is a newer and more capable format, there are still cases where analog may be the better choice. It all depends on a few factors and your specific requirements. But first, we need to understand what the two different formats are: Analog Video Security System Analog video cameras use conventional base band format over coaxial or UTP cables as a means of transmitting video to a destination, which in most cases is a DVR. While the live and recorded video is transmitted in analog format, it can still be accessed over LAN, WAN, or through the Internet because DVRs can digitize the video and store them on hard drives. IP Video Security System As the IP in the name implies, IP video cameras transmit video as a digital stream via an IP network. Similar to analog, IP video security systems record the video stream to a hard drive, but where it differs is that the DVR is typically replaced with a Network Video Recorder (NVR). Additionally, since the video is transmitted in a digital format, there is no longer any need to convert the stream from analog to digital, making transmission faster and allowing for more flexibility as to where the video is stored. Looking for an IP video security system in CT?  Trust Mammoth Security. Which Format to Choose? As mentioned earlier, the choice between IP vs analog...